Posts Tagged ‘cops

25
Nov
14

The President’s Day

3df7e11e5937772e660f6a7067002258

President Barack Obama waves as he is introduced at Copernicus Community Center in Chicago to speak on immigration reform

****

****

The President’s remarks on Ferguson

I need to begin by saying a few words about what’s happened over the past day, not just in Ferguson, Missouri, our neighbor to the south, but all across America.

As many of you know, a verdict came down – or a grand jury made a decision yesterday that upset a lot of people. And as I said last night, the frustrations that we’ve seen are not just about a particular incident. They have deep roots in many communities of color who have a sense that our laws are not always being enforced uniformly or fairly. That may not be true everywhere, and it’s certainly not true for the vast majority of law enforcement officials, but that’s an impression that folks have and it’s not just made up. It’s rooted in realities that have existed in this country for a long time.

Now, as I said last night, there are productive ways of responding and expressing those frustrations, and there are destructive ways of responding. Burning buildings, torching cars, destroying property, putting people at risk – that’s destructive and there’s no excuse for it. Those are criminal acts, and people should be prosecuted if they engage in criminal acts.

But what we also saw – although it didn’t get as much attention in the media – was people gathering in overwhelmingly peaceful protest – here in Chicago, in New York, in Los Angeles, other cities.

We’ve seen young people who were organizing, and people beginning to have real conversations about how do we change the situation so that there’s more trust between law enforcement and some of these communities.  And those are necessary conversations to have.

We’re here to talk about immigration, but part of what makes America this remarkable place is being American doesn’t mean you have to look a certain way or have a certain last name or come from a certain place; it has to do with a commitment to ideals, a belief in certain values.  And if any part of the American community doesn’t feel welcomed or treated fairly, that’s something that puts all of us at risk and we all have to be concerned about it.

So my message to those people who are constructively moving forward, trying to organize, mobilize, and ask hard, important questions about how we improve the situation – I want all those folks to know that their President is going to work with them. Separate and apart from the particular circumstances in Ferguson, which I am careful not to speak to because it’s not my job as President to comment on ongoing investigations and specific cases, but the frustrations people have generally – those are rooted in some hard truths that have to be addressed.

And so those who are prepared to work constructively, your President will work with you.  And a lot of folks, I believe, in law enforcement and a lot of folks in city halls and governor’s offices across the country want to work with you as well.

So as part of that, I’ve instructed Attorney General Eric Holder not just to investigate what happened in Ferguson, but also identify specific steps we can take together to set up a series of regional meetings focused on building trust in our communities. And next week, we’ll bring together state and local officials, and law enforcement, and community leaders and faith leaders to start identifying very specific steps that we can take to make sure that law enforcement is fair and is being applied equally to every person in this country.

And we know certain things work. We know that if we train police properly, that that improves policing and makes people feel that the system is fair. We know that when we have a police force that is representative of the communities it’s serving that makes a difference. And we know that when there’s clear accountability and transparency when something happens that makes a difference.

So there are specific things we can do, and the key now is for us to lift up the best practices and work, city by city, state by state, county by county, all across this country, because the problem is not just a Ferguson problem, it is an American problem.  And we’ve got to make sure that we are actually bringing about change.

The bottom line is, nothing of significance, nothing of benefit results from destructive acts. I’ve never seen a civil rights law, or a health care bill, or an immigration bill result because a car got burned. It happened because people vote. It happened because people mobilize. It happened because people organize. It happens because people look at what are the best policies to solve the problem. That’s how you actually move something forward.

So don’t take the short-term, easy route and just engage in destructive behavior. Take the long-term, hard but lasting route of working with me and governors and state officials to bring about some real change.

And to those who think that what happened in Ferguson is an excuse for violence, I do not have any sympathy for that. I have no sympathy at all for destroying your own communities.

But for the overwhelming majority of people who just feel frustrated and pain because they get a sense that maybe some communities aren’t treated fairly, or some individuals aren’t seen as worthy as others, I understand that. And I want to work with you and I want to move forward with you.

Your President will be right there with you.

Rest of transcript from today’s speech here

****

4f718825782a782e660f6a7067002743

President Barack Obama discusses immigration reform with community leaders

****

04b2c0c35937772e660f6a706700a7bd

President Barack Obama with Billy Lawless who introduced him

2014-11-25T234600Z_24979932_GM1EABQ0LF101_RTRMADP_3_USA-OBAMA

d9c8c8375937772e660f6a7067003acb

****

Barack+Obama+Barack+Obama+Discusses+Executive+ZVenDc49Nrll

259cfa95782e782e660f6a7067007077

President Obama addresses three hecklers who rudely interrupted him while he was speaking about immigration reform

****

OBAMA-IMMIGRATION-CHICAGO

OBAMA-IMMIGRATION-CHICAGO

cec41986782f782e660f6a7067001009

25
Nov
14

Why Can’t You See Our Humanity?

****

I came back home last night, turned on the TV, and saw the news that there would be no indictment in the murder of Michael Brown. I remember falling to my knees and crying with one thought playing over and over in my head: “We are human. We are flesh and blood. We are human and they can’t even see it.”

Black people get up everyday and contribute to the prosperity of this society. We are children, we are teenagers, we are parents, we are students, we are business owners, we are doctors, we are lawyers, we are everything A to Z. We are human. Yet everyday you are killing us. You are killing our children, you are killing our brothers, you are killing our sisters, you are killing our parents. A Black person gets stopped by the cops and shakes in fear, trembles with fear that he or she makes it home alive. Your white parent, child, brother, or sister will never know this fear but every Black person knows that fear or will experience it. This is a horror in a country that calls itself exceptional. A Black man or woman walks out the door, comes back home, and looks to the heavens, thinking “thank God, I lived today.” This is a scourge in a country that proclaims to be great.

I continue to look forward to the day when the lines “all men are created equal” and “with liberty and justice for all” will become reality and not some refrain we toss around. I continue to look forward to the day when society recognizes our humanity. And as always, we carry on.

****

B3QsKZJCMAARxKW.jpg-large

****

Joy

Good morning all. I rarely post but I had to this morning. As you see I live in Barbados but I am Jamaican and am therefore a West Indian. Why is this significant because I have two sisters and a brother in the US one sister who lives in New York has a son who is twenty years old and I have numerous friends from the West Indies with sons who live in various parts of the US. I cried last night when I heard the outcome. I cried for them. I often call my sister and remind her to speak to her son. He is a regular 20 year old, he goes to college, he wears his cap backwards, he goes to the cinema with his friend, he does the things that you would expect them to do at that age. When I read of these killings my heart hurts for all young men in the US who may not grow up to live their dreams. What next?

****

****

Rikyrah

went to sleep with the images of Mike Brown’s parents on my mind.

White people simply do not understand the fundamental lack of trust in law enforcement that exists within the Black community. And, they don’t understand why that undermines this country as a whole.

I’m not talking about Pookey and Ray-Ray having no trust.

I’m talking about my and the overwhelming swaths of Black America that gets up, goes to work everyday, and loves their family. The people like me, who have never had nothing more than a parking ticket in terms of ‘ infractions’.

I do not trust law enforcement.

If on a jury, I would never give them the benefit of the doubt.

I wouldn’t trust a word that comes out of their mouths.

Period.

I have three degrees and I have no more trust in law enforcement than Pookey.

If you don’t understand what that means…

oh well.

****

B3QdHzeCcAARAQ2.jpg-large

****

Don

It gets tiring singing “We shall overcome someday” all the time, just saying. Black people are the only people that have to sing songs and love the very people that don’t love us. It is a miracle that every black man in America isn’t schizophrenic, we are told to turn the other cheek and forgive the very people that brutalize us. A white kid can walk into a school and kill as many kids as he can and the first thing out of everyone’s mouth is that kid needs help. But a black kid walking down the street with his pants sagging and baseball cap turned sideways is considered a menace to society. At this point in time I’m not ready to forgive or forget, and I’m not interested in holding hands and singing songs.

****

Police Brutality

****

OurManFlint

yes it is depressing. recently in Toronto, my father elderly father in-law was followed by two cops, (one black and other white), in a cruiser while walking through a field while wearing his hood up. they eventually stopped him and asked where he was going and such. he did not take kindly to that and asked why had they stopped him, they said Oh to remind folks to be safe …. he then gave them a piece of his mind and said now he knows exactly what black youths are facing; and asked them what should he say to his grand kids that it is not safe to be out, or that they could be stopped. While at the same time people of other races cut through the same field and are never followed or stopped. They drove away and waited till he emerged on the other side of the field and waved at him. I guess they were ashamed but who knows…

****

10
Oct
14

A Tweet Or Two

****

****

****

****

Continue reading ‘A Tweet Or Two’

22
Aug
14

Rise and Shine

 On This Day: “A man salutes the President as he travels from Seneca Falls to Syracuse, N.Y. during the college affordability bus tour. Aug. 22, 2013 (Photo by Pete Souza)

****

NYT: Obama Cares. Look At The Numbers.

AS the predominantly black, disproportionately poor community of Ferguson, Mo., erupted in protest after the shooting death of Michael Brown, critics excoriated President Obama for his failure to empathize. Michael Eric Dyson, for example, called the president’s statement about the case on Monday a “stunning epic failure.” Mr. Obama’s defenders point to his second-term commitment to issues that touch the lives of poor communities of color, especially his initiative to assist young minority men, My Brother’s Keeper. But what both sides are ignoring is the president’s first-term record.

A true measure of a president’s priorities lies hidden in plain sight in his budget proposals. Under that standard, Mr. Obama has been more committed to communities like Ferguson than any Democratic president in the past half century. … …. Even after accounting for the higher numbers of poor people caught in the Great Recession, Mr. Obama’s record outshines his predecessors’. His proposed first-term spending per poor individual was $13,731 to Mr. Clinton’s $8,310 and Mr. Carter’s $4,431, in 2014 dollars.

More here

****

****

Slate: Advice For Ferguson From The Supreme Court

Kyle Niere, 23, was arrested on Monday night in Ferguson, Missouri, for “refusing to disperse” as he attempted to leave the QuikTrip station, where hundreds have gathered to protest the police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen. As he later relayed to NBC News, Niere, along with 12 other protesters, was arrested after cops told him and his friends that they “looked like the type that were going to stir up drama and go start looting.” According to Niere, police officers dragged him “face-first on the ground” and were “stepping on the back of our heads.” Niere and the others were held overnight and released. This has been the pattern for more than a week: Dozens of legitimate protesters arrested for essentially doing it wrong, which can be variously described as protesting about issues of race, refusing to stop protesting about issues of race, and in many cases, perhaps most outrageously, protesting while black.

It’s virtually impossible to square the law enforcement definition of illegal protest with the snuggly warm vision of political protest put forth by a unanimous Supreme Court only two months ago in McCullen v. Coakley. That was the case in which the high court struck down a Massachusetts law barring any protests within 35 feet of an abortion clinic. That law was passed after two clinic workers were shot and killed at clinics in 1994. But there is a crucial difference between the abortion opponents whose speech rights were feted by the court in McCullen and the garden variety protesters who can still be rounded up in free speech pens and summarily arrested on the streets of Ferguson: The court was careful to explain that the protesters in Massachusetts are not actually “protesters.” They are “counselors.” This presents an obvious solution for the outraged citizens who have taken to the streets of Ferguson and been met with tear gas, rubber bullets, and incarceration: rebranding. From this day forth you should consider yourself “sidewalk counselors.”

More here

****

See video here

****

Robin_Williams-Esquire

****

Brian Lord: A Little Known Robin Williams Story

Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event- anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found.

He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. Thanks, Robin Williams- not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.

More here

****

BN-EF111_DISTRE_G_20140821115357

****

Nick Timiraos: Foreclosed-Property Sales Fall to Lowest Levels Since 2008

Thursday’s home-sales report offers the clearest evidence that the housing market is moving out of the emergency ward and into a rehab facility. The National Association of Realtors reported that home sales rose for the fourth straight month in July to the highest seasonally adjusted annual rate since last September. But the real sign that the housing market is out of critical condition comes courtesy of a separate survey the NAR does of its members. That survey estimates the share of distressed home sales in July fell to 9% of all sales, the lowest level since the trade group’s tally began in October 2008.

the drop in foreclosed-property sales deserves attention. Sales of non-distressed homes, using crude estimates derived from the NAR’s survey, are up slightly from a year ago. Prices are still rising, but not as sharply as they were a year ago. And higher prices could be drawing out more sellers. Inventories are at their highest levels in nearly two years—and this time, they appear to be rising because Joe and Jane Homeowner, not a bank or mortgage-processing company, wants to sell.

More here

****

20
Aug
14

A Tweet Or Two: Ferguson

****

****

****

Continue reading ‘A Tweet Or Two: Ferguson’

20
Aug
14

Ferguson: The World Is Watching

****

****

****

Continue reading ‘Ferguson: The World Is Watching’




@BarackObama

@WhiteHouse

@FLOTUS

@blog44

@PeteSouza

Enter your email address to receive notifications of new posts by email.

@TheObamaDiary

@NerdyWonka

@Lib_Librarian

@Our4thEstate

@DaRiverZkind

@zizii2

RSS OFA

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Categories

Archives

Blog Stats

  • 28,450,051 hits
November 2014
M T W T F S S
« Oct    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930