Posts Tagged ‘interview

20
Aug
15

#MyBrothersKeeper: A Brighter Future

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Hamil R. Harris: White House Mentee Heads To Morehouse College

Noah McQueen used to spend more time fighting and getting arrested than getting good grades and listening to advice. He changed households and public schools 10 times before he landed at the Maryland Juvenile Justice Cheltenham Youth Center. But times have changed. “Do you need a ride back to the White House?” a presidential aide asked McQueen, 19, as he stood inside Eddie’s Hair Design in Adams Morgan on a recent day. “No, I have my own car now,” he responded. McQueen didn’t need a barber; he had a fresh haircut. He was there to work. McQueen was there with Broderick Johnson, head of the White House’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative, to be a role model to students from Marie Reed Elementary School.

The initiative was launched last year to improve educational and job opportunities for young men of color. White House officials, including President Obama, have worked hard to help McQueen. His life changed three years ago, when, as a student at Dr. Henry A. Wise Jr. High School in Upper Marlboro, he began mentoring children at nearby Barack Obama Elementary. “I get choked up . . . when I think about where I was,” McQueen said as he reflected on a troubled childhood that included several suspensions, arrests and other run-ins with the law. Now McQueen is a freshman at Morehouse College in Atlanta. He graduated in May from Wise, where he finished with a 3.25 grade-point average even though his freshman and sophomore years were academic disasters.

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Congratulations and good luck, Noah!

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16
Aug
15

Rest In Peace, Power, And Greatness, Julian Bond

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Roy Reed: Julian Bond, Former N.A.A.C.P. Chairman And Civil Rights Leader, Dies At 75

Julian Bond, a former chairman of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, a charismatic figure of the 1960s civil rights movement, a lightning rod of the anti-Vietnam War campaign and a lifelong champion of equal rights for minorities, died on Saturday night, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center. He was 75. Mr. Bond died in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., after a brief illness, the center said in a statement Sunday morning. He was one of the original leaders of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, while he was a student at Morehouse College in Atlanta. He moved from the militancy of the student group to the top leadership of the establishmentarian N.A.A.C.P. Along the way, he was a writer, poet, television commentator, lecturer, college teacher, and persistent opponent of the stubborn remnants of white supremacy.

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He also served for 20 years in the Georgia Legislature, mostly in conspicuous isolation from white colleagues who saw him as an interloper and a rabble-rouser. Mr. Bond’s wit, cool personality and youthful face became familiar to millions of television viewers during the 1960s and 1970s; he was described as dashing, handsome and urbane. On the strength of his personality and quick intellect, he moved to the center of the civil rights action in Atlanta, the unofficial capital of the movement, at the height of the struggle for racial equality in the early 1960s. Moving beyond demonstrations, he became a founder, with Morris Dees, of the Southern Poverty Law Center, a legal advocacy organization in Montgomery, Ala. Mr. Bond was its president from 1971 to 1979 and remained on its board for the rest of his life.

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When he was elected to the Georgia House of Representatives in 1965 — along with seven other black members — furious white members of the House refused to let him take his seat, accusing him of disloyalty. He was already well known because of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s stand against the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War. That touched off a national drama that ended in 1966, when the Supreme Court in a unanimous decision ordered the legislature to seat him, saying it had denied him freedom of speech. He went on to serve 20 years in the two houses of the legislature. As a lawmaker, he sponsored bills to establish a sickle cell anemia testing program and to provide low-interest home loans to low-income Georgians. He also helped create a majority-black congressional district in Atlanta.

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You can watch parts 2-6 by clicking on the video and watching it on Youtube

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10
Aug
15

Rise And Shine

President Barack Obama greets Ambassador Alieu Momodou Ngum, of Republic of The Gambia, and his family before the start of an ambassador credentialing ceremony in the Oval Office, Aug. 10, 2010. The presentation of credentials is a traditional ceremony that marks the formal beginning of an ambassadorÕs service in Washington. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza) This official White House photograph is being made available only for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way and may not be used in commercial or political materials, advertisements, emails, products, promotions that in any way suggests approval or endorsement of the President, the First Family, or the White House.

President Barack Obama greets Ambassador Alieu Momodou Ngum, of Republic of The Gambia, and his family before the start of an ambassador credentialing ceremony in the Oval Office, Aug. 10, 2010. The presentation of credentials is a traditional ceremony that marks the formal beginning of an ambassador’s service in Washington. Photo by Pete Souza

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William J. Broad: 29 U.S. Scientists Praise Iran Nuclear Deal In Letter To Obama

Twenty-nine of the nation’s top scientists — including Nobel laureates, veteran makers of nuclear arms and former White House science advisers — wrote to President Obama on Saturday to praise the Iran deal, calling it innovative and stringent. “We congratulate you and your team,” the letter says in its opening to Mr. Obama, adding that the Iran deal “will advance the cause of peace and security in the Middle East and can serve as a guidepost for future nonproliferation agreements.” In a technical judgment that seemed more ominous than some other assessments of Tehran’s nuclear capability, the letter says that Iran, before curbing its nuclear program during the long negotiations,

was “only a few weeks” away from having fuel for nuclear weapons. The deal’s plan for resolving disputes, the letter says, greatly mitigates “concerns about clandestine activities.” It hails the 24-day cap on Iranian delays to site investigations as “unprecedented,” adding that the agreement “will allow effective challenge inspection for the suspected activities of greatest concern.” It also welcomes as without precedent the deal’s explicit banning of research on nuclear weapons “rather than only their manufacture,” as established in the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty, the top arms-control agreement of the nuclear age.

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Frank Main: Chicago Police And ACLU Agree To Major Changes In Stop-And-Frisk Policy

Responding to a scathing report by a civil-rights group, Chicago Police Supt. Garry McCarthy agreed Thursday to have a retired judge evaluate the department’s stop-and-frisk practices and require his officers to document whenever they conduct a pat-down. The American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois blasted the department in March for failing to record when officers frisk someone. The ACLU also questioned whether officers often stop people illegally. The stops have disproportionally targeted blacks, even in white neighborhoods, the ACLU found. Under the settlement, the police department will expand the information on “contact cards” that officers have been required to fill out when they stop someone on the street for questioning.

The cards list the person’s name, race, sex, address, phone number and other personal information. The officer checks a box for the type of contact: traffic-related, suspicious person, gang- or drug-related, crime victim or other. If the stop involves a vehicle, there are boxes to describe the make, model and license plate number. There are also three lines for the officer to provide a reason for the stop. Now contact cards will also say whether the person was frisked, whether contraband like a gun was found, and whether there was an arrest, warning or citation. That will allow for better monitoring of stop-and-frisk practices and their impact on minorities, according to the ACLU.

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President Barack Obama meets with advisors in the Oval Office, Aug. 10, 2012. Pictured, from left, are: Mike Froman, Deputy National Security Advisor for International Economic Affairs; Senior Advisor David Plouffe; Chief of Staff Jack Lew; National Economic Council Director Gene Sperling; and Council of Economic Advisers Chair Alan Krueger. Photo by Pete Souza

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With lipstick on his cheek from a woman’s kiss, President Barack Obama greets people in the audience following remarks at the Disabled American Veterans (DAV) National Convention at the Orlando Hilton in Orlando, Fla., Saturday, Aug. 10, 2013. Photo by Pete Souza

29
Jul
15

First Lady Michelle Obama Discusses Education

26
Jul
15

The President’s Sunday In Kenya And Ethiopia

President Barack Obama thanks the crowd after delivering a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Auma Obama, half-sister of President Barack Obama, introduces him prior to giving a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in the Kasarani area of Nairobi, Kenya Sunday, July 26, 2015. Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Auma Obama, sister of President Barack Obama, introduces him

President Barack Obama delivers a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama delivers a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena in Nairobi. He laid out his vision for Kenya’s future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations

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Members of the audience at the front of the crowd listen to President Barack Obama deliver a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in the Kasarani area of Nairobi, Kenya Sunday, July 26, 2015. Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Members of the audience take selfies as President Barack Obama gives a speech behind them, at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in the Kasarani area of Nairobi, Kenya Sunday, July 26, 2015. Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

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People cheer as President Barack Obama arrives to deliver a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama delivers a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in the Kasarani area of Nairobi, Kenya Sunday, July 26, 2015. Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

U.S. President Barack Obama delivers remarks at an indoor stadium in Nairobi July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenya on Saturday the United States was ready to work more closely in the battle against Somalia's Islamist group al Shabaab, but chided his host on gay rights and said no African state should discriminate over sexuality. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

President Barack Obama delivers a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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President Barack Obama, bottom right, shakes hands after delivering a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

U.S. President Barack Obama takes the stage to deliver remarks at an indoor stadium in Nairobi July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenya on Saturday the United States was ready to work more closely in the battle against Somalia's Islamist group al Shabaab, but chided his host on gay rights and said no African state should discriminate over sexuality. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

President Barack Obama, bottom center, shakes hands after delivering a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama waves to the crowd as he arrives to give a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in the Kasarani area of Nairobi, Kenya Sunday, July 26, 2015. Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

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U.S. President Barack Obama waves to the crowd as he departs after his remarks at an indoor stadium in Nairobi July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenya on Saturday the United States was ready to work more closely in the battle against Somalia's Islamist group al Shabaab, but chided his host on gay rights and said no African state should discriminate over sexuality. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

U.S. President Barack Obama thanks the crowd as he departs after his remarks at an indoor stadium in Nairobi July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenya on Saturday the United States was ready to work more closely in the battle against Somalia's Islamist group al Shabaab, but chided his host on gay rights and said no African state should discriminate over sexuality. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

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People cheer as the motorcade of President Barack Obama passes by on the way to deliver a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama waves after delivering a speech at Safaricom Indoor Arena, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future, and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama waves goodbye to the crowd, underneath American and Kenyan flags, after delivering a speech at the Safaricom Indoor Arena in the Kasarani area of Nairobi, Kenya, Sunday, July 26, 2015.  Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

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President Barack Obama speaks during a meeting with civil society leaders at the YALI Regional Leadership Center, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama speaks during a meeting with civil society leaders at the YALI Regional Leadership Center

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President Barack Obama listens to a question during a meeting with civil society leaders at the YALI Regional Leadership Center, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's future and broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama meets with civil society leaders at the YALI Regional Leadership Center, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Nairobi. On the final day of his visit in Kenya, Obama laid out his vision for Kenya's futurevand broad themes of U.S.-Kenya relations. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

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U.S. President Barack Obama disembarks Marine One as he arrives at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi to leave for Ethiopia aboard Air Force One July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenyans on Sunday on his first presidential trip to his father's homeland that there was

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U.S. President Barack Obama waves as he departs for Ethiopia aboard Air Force One from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenyans on Sunday on his first presidential trip to his father's homeland that there was

U.S. President Barack Obama waves as he departs for Ethiopia aboard Air Force One from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi July 26, 2015. Obama told Kenyans on Sunday on his first presidential trip to his father's homeland that there was

President Barack Obama waves as he departs for Ethiopia aboard Air Force One from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya

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President Barack Obama waves as he arrives at Addis Ababa Bole International Airport, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Addis Ababa. Obama is the first sitting U.S. president to visit Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Barack Obama waves as he arrives at Addis Ababa Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa. He is the first sitting U.S. president to visit Ethiopia

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Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (L) looks on as U.S. President Barack Obama (R) receives flowers from children as he arrives aboard Air Force One at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia July 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (L) greets U.S. President Barack Obama (R) as he arrives aboard Air Force One at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia July 26, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn greets U.S. President Barack Obama

U.S President Barack Obama, left, walks with Ethiopian prime minister Hailemariam Desalegn, right, after his arrival at Bole International Airport, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Sunday, July 26, 2015.  Obama is traveling on a two-nation African tour where he will become the the first sitting U.S. president to visit Kenya and Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Sayyid Azim)

Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (center R) greets U.S. President Barack Obama as he arrives aboard Air Force One at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia July 26, 2015. REUTERS/ Tiksa Negeri

Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, left, looks on as President Barack Obama is given a bouquet of flowers as he arrives at Addis Ababa Bole International Airport, on Sunday, July 26, 2015, in Addis Ababa. Obama is the first sitting U.S. president to visit Ethiopia. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

  Continue reading ‘The President’s Sunday In Kenya And Ethiopia’




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