Posts Tagged ‘Senator

24
Aug
15

The President’s Day

U.S. President Barack Obama addresses the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, August 24, 2015. The White House expanded its push for greater renewable energy adoption, announcing fresh financial incentives for solar panels, smart grid technology and other alternative energies for homeowners and builders. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

President Barack Obama addresses the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. The White House expanded its push for greater renewable energy adoption, announcing fresh financial incentives for solar panels, smart grid technology and other alternative energies for homeowners and builders

****

****

President Barack Obama, right, and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Harry Reid of Nev. embrace on stage at the National Clean Energy Summit Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President is scheduled to spend the night in Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Members of the audience listen as President Barack Obama speaks at the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President used the speech to announce a set of executive actions and private sector commitments to accelerate America’s transition to cleaner sources of energy and ways to cut energy waste. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Barack+Obama+National+Clean+Energy+Summit+dnpOAXtPO4Rx

President Barack Obama speaks at the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President used the speech to announce a set of executive actions and private sector commitments to accelerate America’s transition to cleaner sources of energy and ways to cut energy waste. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

President Barack Obama is greeted by Senate Minority Leader Sen. Harry Reid, right, as he arrives to speak at the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President used the speech to announce a set of executive actions and other efforts aimed at making it easier for homeowners and businesses to invest in green energy improvements. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Barack+Obama+National+Clean+Energy+Summit+EnGzZqTdx-gx

President Barack Obama, left, and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Harry Reid wave onstage at the National Clean Energy Summit, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President is scheduled to spend the night in Nevada. (AP Photo/John Locher)

U.S. President Barack Obama waves after addressing the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center in Las Vegas, Nevada, August 24, 2015. The White House expanded its push for greater renewable energy adoption, announcing fresh financial incentives for solar panels, smart grid technology and other alternative energies for homeowners and builders. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

Barack+Obama+President+Obama+Speaks+Clean+IF4hjCWkbvOx

President Barack Obama greets Senate Minority Leader Sen. Harry Reid of Nev., after giving remarks at the National Clean Energy Summit at the Mandalay Bay Resort Convention Center, Monday, Aug. 24, 2015, in Las Vegas. The President used the speech to announce a set of executive actions and private sector commitments to accelerate America’s transition to cleaner sources of energy and ways to cut energy waste. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Barack+Obama+National+Clean+Energy+Summit+g90mbZSAJ1rx

30
Mar
15

The President’s Address at the Opening of the Edward Kennedy Institute

****

THE PRESIDENT: Thank you. (Applause.) Thank you so much. To Vicki, Ted, Patrick, Curran, Caroline, Ambassador Smith, members of the Kennedy family — thank you so much for inviting me to speak today. Your Eminence, Cardinal O’Malley; Vice President Biden; Governor Baker; Mayor Walsh; members of Congress, past and present; and pretty much every elected official in Massachusetts — (laughter) — it is an honor to mark this occasion with you.

Boston, know that Michelle and I have joined our prayers with yours these past few days for a hero — former Army Ranger and Boston Police Officer John Moynihan, who was shot in the line of duty on Friday night. (Applause.) I mention him because, last year, at the White House, the Vice President and I had the chance to honor Officer Moynihan as one of America’s “Top Cops” for his bravery in the line of duty, for risking his life to save a fellow officer. And thanks to the heroes at Boston Medical Center, I’m told Officer Moynihan is awake, and talking, and we wish him a full and speedy recovery. (Applause.)

I also want to single out someone who very much wanted to be here, just as he was every day for nearly 25 years as he represented this commonwealth alongside Ted in the Senate — and that’s Secretary of State John Kerry. (Applause.) As many of you know, John is in Europe with our allies and partners, leading the negotiations with Iran and the world community, and standing up for a principle that Ted and his brother, President Kennedy, believed in so strongly: “Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate.” (Applause.)

And, finally, in his first years in the Senate, Ted dispatched a young aide to assemble a team of talent without rival. The sell was simple: Come and help Ted Kennedy make history. So I want to give a special shout-out to his extraordinarily loyal staff — (applause) — 50 years later a family more than one thousand strong. This is your day, as well. We’re proud of you. (Applause.) Of course, many of you now work with me. (Laughter.) So enjoy today, because we got to get back to work. (Laughter.)

Distinguished guests, fellow citizens — in 1958, Ted Kennedy was a young man working to reelect his brother, Jack, to the United States Senate. On election night, the two toasted one another: “Here’s to 1960, Mr. President,” Ted said, “If you can make it.” With his quick Irish wit, Jack returned the toast: “Here’s to 1962, Senator Kennedy, if you can make it.” (Laughter.) They both made it. And today, they’re together again in eternal rest at Arlington.

But their legacies are as alive as ever together right here in Boston. The John F. Kennedy Library next door is a symbol of our American idealism; the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate as a living example of the hard, frustrating, never-ending, but critical work required to make that idealism real.

What more fitting tribute, what better testament to the life of Ted Kennedy, than this place that he left for a new generation of Americans — a monument not to himself but to what we, the people, have the power to do together.

Any of us who have had the privilege to serve in the Senate know that it’s impossible not to share Ted’s awe for the history swirling around you — an awe instilled in him by his brother, Jack. Ted waited more than a year to deliver his first speech on the Senate floor. That’s no longer the custom. (Laughter.) It’s good to see Trent and Tom Daschle here, because they remember what customs were like back then. (Laughter.)

And Ted gave a speech only because he felt there was a topic — the Civil Rights Act — that demanded it. Nevertheless, he spoke with humility, aware, as he put it, that “a freshman Senator should be seen, not heard; should learn, and not teach.”

Some of us, I admit, have not always heeded that lesson. (Laughter.) But fortunately, we had Ted to show us the ropes anyway. And no one made the Senate come alive like Ted Kennedy. It was one of the great pleasures of my life to hear Ted Kennedy deliver one of his stem winders on the Floor. Rarely was he more animated than when he’d lead you through the living museums that were his offices. He could — and he would — tell you everything that there was to know about all of it. (Laughter.)

And then there were more somber moments. I still remember the first time I pulled open the drawer of my desk. Each senator is assigned a desk, and there’s a tradition of carving the names of those who had used it before. And those names in my desk included Taft and Baker, Simon, Wellstone, and Robert F. Kennedy.

The Senate was a place where you instinctively pulled yourself up a little bit straighter; where you tried to act a little bit better. “Being a senator changes a person,” Ted wrote in his memoirs. As Vicki said, it may take a year, or two years, or three years, but it always happens; it fills you with a heightened sense of purpose.

That’s the magic of the Senate. That’s the essence of what it can be. And who but Ted Kennedy, and his family, would create a full-scale replica of the Senate chamber, and open it to everyone?

We live in a time of such great cynicism about all our institutions. And we are cynical about government and about Washington, most of all. It’s hard for our children to see, in the noisy and too often trivial pursuits of today’s politics, the possibilities of our democracy — our capacity, together, to do big things.

And this place can help change that. It can help light the fire of imagination, plant the seed of noble ambition in the minds of future generations. Imagine a gaggle of school kids clutching tablets, turning classrooms into cloakrooms and hallways into hearing rooms, assigned an issue of the day and the responsibility to solve it.

Imagine their moral universe expanding as they hear about the momentous battles waged in that chamber and how they echo throughout today’s society. Great questions of war and peace, the tangled bargains between North and South, federal and state; the original sins of slavery and prejudice; and the unfinished battles for civil rights and opportunity and equality.

Imagine the shift in their sense of what’s possible. The first time they see a video of senators who look like they do — men and women, blacks and whites, Latinos, Asian-Americans; those born to great wealth but also those born of incredibly modest means.

Continue reading ‘The President’s Address at the Opening of the Edward Kennedy Institute’

29
Mar
15

Welcome Home, President Obama

Barack Obama

President Barack Obama waves as he boards Air Force One at St. Lucie International Airport, Fort Pierce, Florida, on a return trip to Washington, D.C.

Barack Obama,  Scott Van Duzer

Barack Obama, Scorr Van Duzer

President Barack Obama talks to Scott Van Duzer on the tarmac of St. Lucie International Airport before boarding Air Force One in Fort Pierce, Florida

****

Remember Scott? :)

****

Barack Obama

****

That sound you hear is Chips mom rightfully yelling: STOP RUNNING DOWN THE STEPS ;)

Barack Obama

President Barack Obama holds onto the hand rail as he nearly slips on the steps during his arrival on Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base

****

Nice recovery, Mr. President. Chips mom thanks you. :)

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

President Barack Obama waves as he walks across the South Lawn of the White House from Marine One, as he returns from Florida

Barack Obama, Terri Bonoff

President Barack Obama greets Minnesota State Senator Terri Bonoff, D-Minnetonka, left, mother of White House aide Joe Paulsen

Barack Obama, Terri Bonoff

29
Sep
14

Chat Away

On This Day: Senator Barack Obama on the tarmac near his campaign plane in Reno, Nevada, September 29, 2008

22
Sep
14

President Obama Signs The America’s Promise Summit Declaration

Barack+Obama+Obama+Signs+America+Promise+Summit+uVuqEYHlMsRl

President Barack Obama signs the America’s Promise Summit Declaration, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. From left are, John Gomperts, President and CEO, America’s Promise Alliance, Alma Powell, Chair, America’s Promise Alliance, the president, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, and former Pennsylvania Sen. Harris Wofford.

****

Text of the President’s remarks here

Information on America’s Promise here

****

Barack+Obama+Obama+Signs+America+Promise+Summit+iNuKS9q_dLyl

36bd4c7c55017225600f6a706700e9a9

333d4385550d7325600f6a7067007d25

Barack+Obama+Obama+Signs+America+Promise+Summit+Bo2H24NTkO6l

51134cdd55077225600f6a70670080c7

President Barack Obama answers a question about the performance of the Secret Service after a signing the America’s Promise Summit Declaration, in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. The president said the Secret Service does “a great job.” He says he is grateful for the “sacrifices” the service performs on his behalf and on behalf of his family.

23
Aug
14

Where The Hell Were These Blackademics Before 2008?

Barack Obama in 1992 as director of Project Vote; which achieved its goal of registering 150,000 African American voters

****

Don

Where the hell were these blackademics before 2008?

They damn sure didn’t help the black farmers get their money, they damn sure didn’t get black people health insurance, and they damn sure didn’t help our black gay brothers and sisters from getting kicked out of the military.

So where the hell were they?

I’ll tell you where they were, they were at each other’s schools sitting on some fucking panel theorizing about how to end racism or make it better for African Americans.

But do you know where President Obama was?

He was out in the streets registering people to vote, he was condemning an unjust war before it became fashionable to do so.

We got pictures of Barack Obama fresh out of college walking in poor black neighborhoods registering people to vote.

We got pictures of a young Barack Obama helping black folk.

We got pictures of a young Barack Obama sitting in a village in Kenya breaking bread with his grandmother.

And these same motherfuckers want to question his blackness

****

Barack Obama in Chicago, 1995, photo by Marc PoKempner

Illinois State Senator Barack Obama at a community meeting in his district with his state representative (second from right) House Majority Leader Barbara Flynn Currie

Barack Obama in his first year at Harvard Law School after working at Developing Communities Project as a community organizer from 1985 – 1988 where he set up a tenants rights organization, job training program, and college preparatory program. He enrolled at Harvard Law School in the fall of 1988 so as to better help his community

This photo released by Obama for America shows Barack Obama teaching at the University of Chicago Law School. After Harvard Law School, Obama returned to Chicago, joined a small civil rights firm, ran a voter registration drive, and lectured on constitutional law at the University of Chicago Law School

Barack Obama with his grandmother Sarah Hussein Obama in her home in the village of Nyagoma-Kogelo, western Kenya, 1987

Barack Obama at an antiwar rally in Chicago in September 2002

****

****

****

****

@SmartyPants

****

o2

After his graduation from Harvard Law School, working on a voter registration drive in Chicago

04
Aug
14

53 Years: The Journey In Images


1961

• • •

toddler

1962

• • •

 

 

1963

• • •

 Meanwhile, in Chicago …. a girl is born.

1964

• • •

A young Barack Obama on a tricycle in Hawaii in the 1960s.

1965

• • •

1966

• • •

1967

• • •

OBAMA-INDONESIA

OBAMA-INDONESI

1968

• • •

1969

• • •

Continue reading ’53 Years: The Journey In Images’

17
May
14

Chat Away

A Blast from the Past




@POTUS

@BarackObama

@WhiteHouse

@FLOTUS

@blog44

@PeteSouza

Enter your email address to receive notifications of new posts by email.

@TheObamaDiary

@NerdyWonka

@Lib_Librarian

@Our4thEstate

@DaRiverZkind

@zizii2

Categories

Archives

Blog Stats

  • 32,220,820 hits
August 2015
M T W T F S S
« Jul    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31